Prayers for Mental Wellness

Heavenly Father, I come to You today seeking guidance. I strive to be your strongest soldier, but I cannot do so without acknowledging my own weaknesses first. Lord, help me to overcome these battles my mind has challenged me with. I know You are always with me, and any hurdles I face can be conquered with Your grace. My mental health is not at its best, but I know this suffering is not permanent. This too shall pass, and I pray that You will continue to watch over me as I fight my own personal demons. Amen.

Dearest Lord, thank You for always being there for me – both for all the good times, and the bad. I know my mental illness does not define me, for who I really am is a child of Christ. I may trip and fall every now and then, and it will hurt, but no pain is as eternal as Your everlasting love for me. Please continue to guide me as I get back on my feet. I shall not be defeated by my mental illness, for your healing hand will save me in my darkest hours. Amen.

Lord, the shining light of my life and my guide. You are the one who guides me through everything. Through these difficult times, help me soar like an eagle and fly. Help me to rise above and overcome my challenges, just as an eagle that soars in the sky. May I gain strength from Your word and from my prayers. I know that one day I will be free as an eagle. There will be no more shackles and not be held down by these weights called mental illness. I trust in You Mighty God who frees me. So give me the strength and renew me every day, till You come again. I ask these in Jesus’ name, Amen. 

Source: Christian.net

Seeds

To trust in what I do not

understand –

the way flowers follow

with imperceptible grace

the sequence of the day,

to bend at nightfall

like wheat in the wind

or to let go,

like seeds anticipating Spring

to be still with the stillness

of my body breathing

is to be, perhaps,

like prayer

alive

and vital in the air.

by Michael S. GlaserPoet Laureate of Maryland, 2004-2009

Where the spirit meets the bone

Compassion

Have compassion for everyone you meet,
even if they don’t want it. What seems conceit,
bad manners, or cynicism is always a sign
of things no ears have heard, no eyes have seen.
You do not know what wars are going on
down there where the spirit meets the bone.

Miller Williams

Forgiveness


“Judge not, and you will not be judged; condemn not, and you will not be condemned; forgive, and you will be forgiven;” – Luke 6:37

Rethink Your Definition of Forgiveness

You might think that forgiveness is about the following:

  • Condoning what the other person did.
  • Giving in.
  • Turning the other cheek.
  • Pretending that nothing happened or that it really wasn’t such a big deal.
  • Admitting that your anger isn’t justified or that you’re not entitled to it.
  • Forcing yourself to get along with someone who you feel may hurt you again.

If so, then you’re probably going to be very reluctant to forgive. And with good reason. Instead, try changing your definition of forgiveness to the following:

  • Forgiveness is about freeing up and putting to better use the energy that is being consumed by holding on to grudges, harbouring resentments, and nursing old wounds.
  • Forgiveness is about moving on.
  • Forgiveness is about choosing serenity and happiness over righteous anger.
  • Forgiveness is about refusing to replay past hurts in your mind over and over again, like a broken record.
  • Forgiveness is about realizing that anger and resentment don’t serve you well.
  • Forgiveness is about giving yourself a clean slate.

Please follow this link to read an article on a Cognitive Behavioural Model for forgiveness.

Resilience

Resilience is the psychological quality that allows some people to be knocked down by the adversities of life and come back at least as strong as before. Rather than letting difficulties, traumatic events, or failure overcome them and drain their resolve, highly resilient people find a way to change course, emotionally heal, and continue moving toward their goals.

What Creates Resilience

Psychologists have identified some of the factors that appear to make a person more resilient, such as a positive attitude, optimism, the ability to regulate emotions, and the ability to see failure as a form of helpful feedback.

Optimism, for instance, has been shown to help blunt the impact of stress on the mind and body in the wake of disturbing experiences. That gives people access to their own cognitive resources, enabling cool-headed analysis of what might have gone wrong and consideration of behavioral paths that might be more productive.

Other aspects of resilience’s roots remain under study. There does appear to be a genetic predisposition for resilience, for instance; but early environments and life circumstances play a role in how resilient genes are ultimately expressed.

Can resilience be taught?

Many factors that determine resilience—such as genetics, early life experiences, and luck—can’t be modified. But specific resilience-building skills can be learned. These include, breaking out of negative thought cycles, pushing back against catastrophizing, and looking for upsides when faced with setbacks.

To learn more about how to build resilience, please follow this link.

Amidst the debris

Old rusty cans and brambles

One golden crocus

L.M.D.

“On the other side of a storm is the strength that comes from having navigated through it. Raise your sail and begin.”
― Gregory S. Williams

The Owl and the Chimpanzee

Written by Jo Camacho

The owl and the chimpanzee went to sea
In a beautiful boat called The Mind
The owl was sensible, clever and smart
The chimp was a little behind
The owl made decisions, based on fact
And knew where to steer its ship
The chimp reacted a little too fast
And often the boat would tip
The waves would come and crash aboard
The chimp would start to cry
Large tears would roll right down his face
Afraid that he would die
The chimp and the owl would wrestle at night
When the world was quiet and still
The chimp would jump up and rock the boat
And the boat would start to fill
Then the owl stepped in and grabbed a pail
And started to empty it out
And the chimp would start to get quite cross
And would often scream and shout
The battle continued night after night
Until the chimp started to see
That if it let the owl take control
A more peaceful night it would be

This poem by clinical hypnotherapist and psychotherapist Jo Camacho beautifully articulates the internal battle many of us face when the more primitive part of our brain (the chimp brain) takes control. The wise owl within all of us is seen here fighting with the chimp who seems determined to make the situation worse, despite its fears of the situation worsening.

What this poem teaches us: Internal conflict is normal and human. If we can learn to control our primitive, scared brain more often and listen to our inner owl, we’ll enjoy a more peaceful journey.

Source: Happiful

❤️ Thank You ❤️

Thank you to my blogging friends – the poets among you, the philosophers, horse addicts, photographers, nature lovers, encouragers, scientists, theologians . . . thank you everyone for your patience and understanding while I take time to rest and recover.